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Summit on Cultivating Inclusion
& Wellbeing in Healthcare

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Tuesday, December 7, 2021


Keynote
8:30 to 10:00 a.m. CST

Workshop Title Coming Soon

Concurrent Workshops 1 & 2
10:15 to 11:45 a.m. CST

1. Innovative Telehealth Wellness Initiatives to Support Clinician Well-Being
2. Sustainable Wellness: Helping the Helpers Cultivate Calm Beyond the Pandemic

Wednesday, December 8, 2021


Keynote
11:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

Creating Connection: Community Wellbeing Amid Strain from COVID-19

Concurrent Sessions 3 & 4
12:45 to 2:15 p.m.

3. NICE and Full of CARE: Staying Connected to Ourselves and Others
4. Equity in Action: A Health System and Community’s Response to Addressing Health Inequities

Thursday, December 9, 2021


Keynote
12:45 to 2:15 p.m. CST

Workshop title coming soon

Concurrent Workshop 5 & 6
2:45 to 4:15 p.m. CST

5. Talking to Children About Race & Racism: Considerations for Healthcare Providers
6. Medical Trauma in Children and Families: How to Recognize It and What do Do with It


Tuesday Keynote Presentation

Title & Description Coming Soon

Tuesday, December 7 | 8:30 to 10:00 a.m. CST

Presented by Dr. Mary Beth Lardizabal


1. Innovative Telehealth Wellness Initiatives to Support Clinician Wellbeing

Tuesday, December 7 | Breakout Session 1 | 10:15 to 11:45 CST

The exceptional response of the nursing profession to meet the demands of the COVID-19 pandemic has been significant and inspiring. Unfortunately, courageousness and selflessness can take an emotional toll. Responding to the pandemic has exacerbated the anxiety, burnout, fatigue and distress being experienced by nurses in ever greater numbers. Recognizing that the pandemic occurred during a national epidemic of clinician burnout, nurse educators collaborated to create an innovative Telehealth Wellness Hub and Wellness Partner Program to support the health and well-being of nurses, clinician colleagues, and health sciences students using telehealth technologies. This workshop details the implementation and outcomes of three initiatives, 1) an Emotional Support Line, 2) the Wellness Partner Program, and 3) CARES Wellness Assessments as examples of innovations to prioritize self-care and wellness during the pandemic. The innovative teaching and learning strategies used within the Telehealth Wellness Hub and Wellness Partner Program re-envisioned clinical education to include assessments of health and well-being from a distance, implementation of wellness coaching strategies, and the creation of partnerships focused on healthy lifestyle behavioral change using telehealth. These programs are an extension of the university and college wellness culture and deep commitment to enhancing health and well-being.

Presented by Alice M. Teall, DNP, APRN-CNP, FAANP, Director of Innovative Telehealth Services, Assistant Professor of Clinical Nursing – Ohio State University

About the Presenter

Alice M. Teall,  DNP, APRN-CNP, FAANP, is Director of Graduate Wellness Academic Programming, Director of Innovative Telehealth Services, and an Assistant Professor of Clinical Nursing at Ohio State University. She was a founding member of the College of Nursing’s team delivering distance education, and has published and presented nationally about innovation in online education, incorporation of wellness coaching in clinical practice, and best practices for teaching telehealth competencies. In recognition of her contributions to advanced practice nursing education, Dr. Teall was honored with the Ohio State University Provost’s Award for Distinguished Teaching and inducted into theAcademy of Teaching.Alice Teall is a Fellow of the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners. As a certified Nurse Practitioner and an Integrative Nurse Coach, her areas of clinical practice expertise include adolescent health, primary care of at-risk youth and families, college health, and recovery from substance use disorder. In response to the pandemic and in collaboration with the Ohio State University Chief Wellness Officer, Dr. Teall led the Telehealth Wellness Hub and Wellness Partner Program initiatives, which included an emotional support line for nurses working in COVID-19 hotspots, wellness assessments for college students across campuses, and wellness partnerships for clinicians in practice.


2. Sustainable Wellness: Helping the Helpers Cultivate Calm Beyond the Pandemic

Tuesday, December 7 | Breakout Session 1 | 10:15 to 11:45 CST

This presentation will focus on suicide prevention strategies for adolescents and young adultThis training will help participants explore ways to be trauma-informed and sustain themselves both in their professions and in their personal lives. Often, providers tend to put others’ needs before their own. However, being regularly exposed to circumstances that impact our clients also affects our mental health. Due to the demands and difficulties we are currently facing, it is not uncommon to question our ability to help clients and community members move forward. This free training will help providers sustain wellness and cultivate calm for themselves beyond the pandemic.

Brandon Jones, MA, Executive Director – Minnesota Association for Children’s Mental Health

About the Presenter

Brandon Jones, MA, is a psychotherapist, professor and consultant, and is the Executive Director of the Minnesota Association for Children’s Mental Health. He specializations in Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs), historical and intergenerational trauma, social/emotional intelligence (EQ), leadership and youth justice. Brandon holds a B.A. in Sociology from the University of Minnesota, a Masters in Community Psychology from Metropolitan State University and a Masters in Psychotherapy (MFT) from Adler Graduate School. Brandon is also a 2013 Bush Foundation Leadership Fellow. He is also a professor of both graduate and undergraduate studies. He lives by the motto of “Live life with purpose on purpose”.


Wednesday Keynote Presentation

Creating Connection: Community Wellbeing Amid Strain from COVID-19

Wednesday, December 8 | 11:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. CST

Health Equity means everyone has a fair and just opportunity to be as healthy as possible. This requires removing obstacles to health such as poverty, discrimination and their consequences, including powerlessness and lack of access to good jobs with fair pay, quality education and housing, safe environments, and health care.

In this panel discussion, the presenters will share how Allina’s Health Equity Team collaborates with organizational leaders to advance health equity by increasing the capacity and capability of leaders and frontline staff to provide culturally responsive care and eliminate health disparities. Vivian and Jamie will share examples of how they have built and leveraged community relationships, highlighting a unique partnership that emerged to expand access to and quality of mental health resources for teens facing disproportionate impacts of COVID-19 through Change to Chill.

Change to Chill is a free, award-winning, mental wellbeing resource offered by Allina Health tailored to both teens and the adults who work with them. Jamie will share how Change to Chill applied health equity principles early in the pandemic to rethink how Change to Chill engages with community to meet the needs of underrepresented and disproportionately impacted populations. Sydney and Maria will discuss how they are working to sustain this work to ensure that teens of all cultures, beliefs and identities see their experiences reflected in Change to Chill resources.

About the Presenters

Vivian Anugwom, MS, CHES  is the Health Equity Manager at Allina Health. She is a trained community health educator with significant experience in health care operations and program development. Throughout her career, she has worked with programs that serve patients across the care continuum from diabetes prevention to end-of-life care. 

Jamie Bachaus, MPH is a Health Equity Specialist at Allina Health. She is a trained public health professional with more than ten years of experience in healthcare, local public health, evaluation and non-profit management.

Sydney Hobart, MPH, MPP, is a Community Health Improvement Specialist with Allina Health. She oversees Change to Chill, which is a prevention-based mental health program geared toward helping teens understand the impacts of stress and anxiety and build resiliency to better manage their mental health and well-being. As a part of this work, Sydney connects primarily with educators, school counseling staff, and teens across the Allina Health service area to respond to emergent community mental health needs. 

Maria Null is a Community Engagement Specialist connecting Allina Health to the South Minneapolis community. She helps connect community leaders to Allina Health to co-create community health solutions. Maria has played an integral role in developing and maintaining community connections to advance equity within Change to Chill


3. NICE and Full of CARE: Staying Connected to Ourselves and Others

Tuesday, December 8 | Breakout Session 2 | 12:45 to 2:15 CST

As health service providers, we often believe that we should shy away from conflict and be NICE (Never In Conflict Energy). However, avoiding conflict can disconnect us from ourselves, the wisdom in our experience, and cause us to miss opportunities to grow closer to and with others. Drawing from trauma-informed and body-based practices, this workshop will offer practical strategies for shifting away from being NICE to exuding greater CARE (Curiosity, Attunement, Regulation, and Engagement) for ourselves and the communities we CARE for.

Presented by Jacob Ham, PhD, Clinical Psychologist & Jacqueline Hargrove, PhD, Clinical Psychologist – Mount Sinai, Icahn School of Medicine

About the Presenters

Jacqueline Hargrove, PhD,  is a licensed clinical psychologist and earned her doctorate degree from the University of Massachusetts Boston. Her clinical interests include addressing complex and racialized trauma, mental health stigma, ethnic minority stress, and exploring the intersections between socio-cultural factors, trauma, and mental health outcomes among children, adolescents, and families.She is intensively trained in Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT) and provides individual, group, and family therapy primarily for adolescents, transitional-aged youth, and young professionals. Currently, Dr. Hargrove is the Assistant Clinical Director of the Complex Trauma Program, a program within Mount Sinai Icahn School of Medicine’s Center for Child Trauma and Resilience. She also serves as a faculty advisor for a peer-led wellness program within Mount Sinai’s Office of Well-Being and Resilience.

Jacob Ham, PhD, is a clinical psychologist, Associate Professor and Director of the Center for Child Trauma and Resilience at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. He receives federal and local funding to advance trauma-informed practices throughout multiple child serving systems throughout NYC. He trains and consults on trauma-informed engagement and maintains an active clinical practice at Mount Sinai Beth Israel for children, families and adults with a particular focus on using moment-to-moment relationship-based interventions that enhance attachment to overcome trauma and improve mental health. He received his PhD at UMass Boston and finished clinical training at Harvard Medical School’s Massachusetts General Hospital and Children’s Hospital Boston.


4. Equity in Action: A Health System and Community’s Response to Addressing Health Inequities

Tuesday December 8 | Breakout Session 2 | 12:45 to 2:15 CST

Workshop description coming soon

About the Presenters

Christina McCoy has been a nonprofit leader in the Twin Cities for more than two decades. In her current role as a Community Partnerships Manager for M Health Fairview, she oversees employee volunteerism and engagement across the system and manages community partnerships in the East Metro area, with an emphasis on the hospitals and surrounding communities of Bethesda, Woodwinds, St. Joseph’s and St. John’s, and supports system wide efforts that focus on Justice, Diversity, Equity and Inclusion. Prior to joining M Health Fairview, Ms. McCoy served Minnesota Community Action Partnership, where she was the Director of Policy and Advocacy, serving the state’s network of 25 Community Action Agencies and managing the Network’s policy agenda focused on fighting poverty at both the local and national level. Prior assignments have included Community Action of Minneapolis, YWCA St. Paul and YMCA Twin Cities. Ms. McCoy received her master’s degree from the University of Minnesota in Organizational Leadership, Policy and Development, and is a Certified Community Action Professional (CCAP), Validated Quality Consultant and IDI Qualified Administrator

Keith Allen, Senior Manager with M Health Fairview, builds community partnerships and leads the team of Community-based Clinical Care and Outreach community, Part of Community Advancement, which including the East Side Health and Well-being Collaborative, Health Commons, Imam Training, Health Education, and Colon Cancer Prevention program. Leading the shift to many of these programs to response to the need of community, because of the current pandemic. Prior to joining MHF he was a Senior Planning Specialist with Ramsey County, where he focused on high-priority, multi-sector initiatives and led development of a continuum of care for Ramsey County youth and families.


Thursday Keynote Presentation

Workshop Title & Description Coming Soon

Thursday, December 9 | 12:45 to 2:15 p.m. CST

About the Presenter

Dr. Sharon Cooper is a Developmental and Forensic Pediatrician who cares for children and select adults with different abilities, as well as those who have been victims of crime. Dr. Cooper retired from the United States Army with the rank of Colonel and holds adjunct faculty positions at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine and the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences at Bethesda, Maryland. She has worked in the area of Forensic Pediatrics since 1980. She has provided numerous lectures nationally and internationally and her primary areas of expertise include all areas of child behavior, child maltreatment, child torture and child sexual exploitation. Dr. Cooper has published numerous chapters on the subject of child sexual exploitation and is the lead editor of one of the most comprehensive texts in the U.S. onthis subject. She is an international consultant in the area of child sexual abuse material (the correct term for images formerly referred to as child pornography). As a Developmental and Forensic Pediatrician, Dr. Cooper evaluates and treats children and families who have experienced adult pornography facilitated sexual crimes.


5. Talking to Children About Race & Racism: Considerations for Healthcare Providers

Thursday, December 9 | Breakout Session 3 | 2:45 to 4:15 CST

Children see race. They recognize phenotypical differences among people. However, research shows that not all parents, caregivers, and adults provide guidance (or even space) around how to navigate conversations about race, identity, and racism. And some parents avoid or silence the topic altogether. There are significant repercussions when we do not provide space for these formative conversations, as silence is where stereotypes, biases, and racism are reinforced. This workshop will focus on navigating discussions around race and racism with children at various developmental levels, why we don’t, why we should, and how to start (or continue). Participants will learn rationale behind the importance of having these conversations and concrete skills for initiating and facilitating these discussions within healthcare settings. 

About the Presenter

Dr. Katherine (Katie) Lingras is an Assistant Professor and Licensed Child Psychologist in the Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences department the University of Minnesota, where she specializes in early childhood mental health, emotional/behavioral regulation concerns, and dyadic (parent-child) treatment for children who have experienced trauma. Her clinical work and research is focused on social-emotional development and building the capacities of the adults who care for them. Dr. Lingras directs the Psychiatry Department’s Early Childhood Mental Health Program, which provides assessment and outpatient parent-child treatment, and also works within the community providing mental health consultation and professional development training in early care and education settings and primary care clinics. Dr. Lingras co-chairs her department’s Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion Committee, serves on the Medical School EDI Committee, and is the Deputy Vice Chair of Impact and Well-Being in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. Dr. Lingras has done regional and national trainings related to race, equity, and their intersection with child-clinical psychology. In her free time, Dr. Lingras enjoys spending time running or biking the lakes in the Twin Cities, singing in a community choir, and spending time with her partner and “furry children.”


6. Medical Trauma in Children and Families: How to Recognize It and What do Do with It

Thursday, December 9 | Breakout Session 3 | 2:45 to 4:15 CST

Approximately 30% of children and their parents and siblings experience significant posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) as the result of diagnosis or treatment of an illness or injury, yet many of these reactions go undetected. Trauma reactions are related to poorer outcomes in children: decreased school functioning, decreased health-related quality of life and greater utilization of medical services.Medical providers have the opportunity to practice trauma-informed medical care to address children and families’ medical trauma reactions, which can result in improved overall health for the child with the medical condition. This presentation will include an overview on how to identify signs and symptoms of trauma reactions in children with medical conditions and their family members and will introduce strategies and resources on how to manage ongoing exposures to potentially traumatic events in the context of healthcare.

About the Presenter

Dr. Meghan Marsac, PhD, is a pediatric psychologist and a tenured Associate Professor at the University of Kentucky and Kentucky Children’s Hospital. Dr. Marsac’s program of research centers on medical trauma and includes conducting grant-funded studies to identify predictors of emotional and physical outcomes in the context of acute or chronic medical conditions, developing and validating assessment tools, and creating and evaluating programs to promote recovery and/or adjustment to medical conditions in children and families. Dr. Marsac is a leader in the field of pediatric medical trauma, having published over 60 academic articles and 10 chapters on this topic. She has co-authored a book for parents to use to help support their children through medical care as well as to care for themselves: Afraid of the Doctor, Every Parent’s Guide to Preventing and Managing Medical Trauma. Dr. Marsac currently serves on the editorial board of the Journal of Pediatric Psychology and Journal of Traumatic Stress. Dr. Marsac has also given hundreds of talks on understanding and promoting adjustment to injury and illness in children and their families. She is the CEO of the Cellie Coping Company (www.celliecopingkit.com), which has distributed over 2000 coping kits to families with children with medical conditions. In addition, Dr. Marsac specializes in training medical teams in the implementation of trauma-informed medical care. Clinically, Dr. Marsac implements evidence-based practices to facilitate families’ management of medical treatment and emotional adjustment to challenging diagnoses and medical procedures. at the Royal United Hospital in Bath.