Events | Trainings

February 4 – March 25 | Earn up to 21 CEHs

Join us for our Winter Training Series, featuring webinars on trauma, sensory regulation, stress, parental incarceration and more.

Not able to join us live? No problem. Each webinar will be recorded and available to watch for 30 days following the live session. For access to the recordings, please register prior to each webinar.

To make our trainings more accessible during the COVID-19 pandemic, our winter webinars are being offered at half their normal rate: $15 per CEH.

Explore continuing education (CEH) details for our Training Series.


Unlikely BFFs: Mental Health & Behavioral Health

Live Webinar | 3 CEHs

While providers at the table in multidisciplinary teams have the clients’ best interests in mind, this is often challenging due to competing theoretical beliefs. During this workshop, strategies for developing one unified treatment plan for the team will be shared instead of each discipline having their own plan.

Learn More | Register

Attachment Focused Family Therapy with Teens and Parents Navigating Complex Trauma Histories

Live Webinar | 3 CEHs

When a child with complex trauma becomes a teen, taking typical independence steps becomes more challenging due to gaps in developmental skills. Participants in this workshop will explore methods to challenge their own teen clients through addressing trauma losses and taking new steps with key adults.

Learn More | Register


Big Movement, No Office: Creating Sensory Regulation Opportunities In Virtual and In-Person Environments

Live Webinar | 3 CEHs

Working in a small office, a classroom, virtually or at home does not limit our ability to use sensory regulation interventions with highly active or distressed youth. This workshop will explore how sensory interventions can be applied to a range of issues to promote healing.

Learn More | Register


Supporting Kids in Distress Using Developmental Repair

Live Webinar | 3 CEHs | Infant & Early Childhood Focus

Young people today are experiencing stress, unpredictability and change at incredibly high rates and intensity. This presentation aims to increase the helping professional’s, teacher’s, caregiver’s and parent’s ability to recognize how and where a child is struggling and to join the child in distress.

Learn More | Register


Convening Tough Conversations Between Adolescent Adoptees and Parents

Live Webinar | 3 CEHs

To work with adoptive teens struggling with their parents means to be active in facilitating parent-teen dialogue. This workshop will demonstrate integrative therapy interventions to increase participants’ confidence in facilitating conversations of belonging, independence and identity between adopted youth and their parents. 

Learn More  | Register


Developmental Consequences of Parental Incarceration for Infants and Young Children

Live Webinar | 3 CEHs | Infant & Early Childhood Focus

This workshop will consider how the incarceration of a parent––and co-occurring Adverse Childhood Experiences––can compromise healthy social, emotional, physical and cognitive development.

Learn More | Register


Helping Families Guide Their Young Children in Growing and Learning in Spite of COVID

Live Webinar | 3 CEHs | Infant & Early Childhood Focus

Families are marking this seemingly impossible anniversary –– a year since the effects of COVID started. Will this ever end? And what is happening to our young children when their lives have been so altered? This webinar will focus on supporting families to anticipate and adapt to what’s ahead.

Learn More  | Register


Unlikely BFFs: Mental Health & Behavioral Health

We truly believe all providers at the table in multidisciplinary teams want to have the clients’ best interests in mind. However, we have been a part of many teams where this has been challenging due to competing theoretical belief systems. This is often to the detriment of our clients. This can be especially true between mental health and behavioral health providers. Research supports there are some common philosophies and these need to be the foundation for service delivery. Goals must be client driven and focus on skill building to be successful. During this workshop, strategies for developing one unified treatment plan for the team will be shared instead of each discipline having their own plan. Current research will be shared along with case examples.

Learning Objectives: 

+ Participants will be able to identify key components of behavioral health services 
+ Participants will contrast this with philosophies and theories of mental health services.
+ Participants will formulate treatment objectives with clients that balance multidisciplinary approaches to service.

Emily Coler Hanson, MS, LMFT & Brian Clark, MA, LAMFT

Level: Intermediate | For: Therapists, Social Workers & Parents | Ages Addressed: Youth to Adult | Includes Clinical Content

Thursday, February 4
9 a.m. – 12 p.m. CST

Live Webinar | 3 CEHs | $45 (special winter rate)

Workshop information for registered webinar participants.

About the Presenters

Emily Coler Hanson, MS, LMFT, is a licensed marriage and family therapist and an AAMFT Approved Supervisor.  She has worked as a therapist for the past ten years and has primarily focused her work on children, adolescents and their families. She has a particular interest in working with children who have experienced trauma, are on the autism spectrum, and prefers a team approach to helping children reach their goals. Her work often takes a strength-based approach and is influenced by the Nurtured Heart Approach. She is currently the chair of the ND LMFT licensing board. 

Brian Clark, MA, LAMFT, is a behavioral specialist and owner of Beyond Behavior. He provides extensive training and supervision for direct care providers and parents, and specializes in the development of positive behavior supports and person-centered planning in home and community settings. Brian is a Nurtured Heart Approach® Advanced Trainer and has over ten years of experience working with children, adolescents, adults, and families. He believes in a multifaceted and team-based approach that caters to a collaborative and inclusive process. Brian’s work with exceptional individuals lends itself to his view that anyone can and will succeed when we believe in and better understand them.


Attachment Focused Family Therapy with Teens and Parents Navigating Complex Trauma Histories

When a child with a complex trauma history becomes a teen, taking typical independence steps becomes more challenging due to gaps in developmental and relational skills. At times, family therapy between this teen and their adult caregivers becomes the best path to reinforce basic safety and belonging so a teen can “catch up” enough developmentally to tend to adolescent life skills. Integrating knowledge from Internal Family Systems, Sensorimotor, DBT and Developmental Dyadic Therapy of Dan Hughes, participants will be guided through steps to first help youth build their stress regulation systems, and then shift stuck interactions with caregivers so they can be “in” instead of sabotaging supportive relationships. In order to playfully engage youth while they are pushing back, therapists and caregivers can challenge youth to experience features of their own emerging nurturing, protective and inner wisdom resources in the family therapy space.

Through case study, participants will explore methods to challenge their own teen clients through addressing trauma losses and choreographing new relational steps with key adults, respectful of differences in culture. This workshop aims to enhance tools and empower those who work with youth in residential and day treatment, foster care, as well as in outpatient psychotherapy.

Krista Nelson, LICSW, LMFT, Psychotherapist and Trauma Consultant – Family Circle Counseling PLLC

Level: Advanced | For: Therapists, Social Workers, Children’s Mental Health Case Managers | Ages Addressed: 13 – 18 | Includes Clinical Content

Wednesday, February 10
9 a.m. – 12 p.m. CST

Live Webinar | 3 CEHs |  $89 $45 (special winter rate)

Workshop information for registered webinar participants.

About the Presenter

Krista Nelson, LICSW, LMFT, has thirty years of post-masters experience working with children and parents who are coping with attachment loss, trauma and family changes, especially with youth who entered a family through adoption.  She is co-founder of Family Circle Counseling in St. Paul, MN and led the Wilder Foundation’s Attachment and Trauma Training program from 2001 to 2017. Krista is a frequent speaker at statewide mental health conferences on issues of attachment and trauma. She continues to co-facilitate the popular MN ADOPT parent workshop Surviving and Thriving Beyond the RAD Diagnosis.  Krista is an attachment focused family therapist with advanced training in EMDR, Theraplay and Emotion Focused Couples Counseling who loves the balance of doing therapy with playful children, teens, adult adoptees, parents and couples in their quest for healing. 


Big Movement, No Office: Creating Sensory Regulation Opportunities In Virtual and In-Person Environments

Working in a small office, a classroom, virtually or in home does not limit our ability to use sensory regulation interventions with highly active or distressed children and youth. In this workshop, participants will identify the differences between sensory intervention categories and how they can be applied to a range of emotional and behavioral issues to promote co-regulation and healing. Additionally, we will explore specific ways in which to use sensory regulation to address the losses, anxiety and disconnection many families are experiencing as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. The morning will be filled with opportunities for interaction and “hands on” virtual practice!

Marit Appeldoorn, MSW, LICSW, RPT-S, Therapist and Consultant –  Private Practice

Level: Intermediate | For: Teachers, Therapists, Skills Workers & Parents | Ages Addressed: Preschool – Adolescent | Includes Clinical Content

Monday, February 15
9 a.m. to 12 p.m. CST

Live Webinar | 3 CEHs | $89 $46 (special winter rate)

Workshop information for registered webinar participants.

About the Presenter

Marit Appeldoorn, MSW, LICSW, RPT-S is a therapist, supervisor, and consultant in private practice in south Minneapolis and is the co-author of Moving Mountains: An Integrative Manual to Help Youth With Intensity, Reactivity, and Anxiety. She is on the adjunct faculty of St. Mary’s University and is a co-founder of Safe Haven, a professional development organization providing support, coaching, mentorship, and training for therapists.


Infant & Early Childhood Focus

Supporting Kids in Distress Using Developmental Repair

Young people today are experiencing stress, unpredictability and change at incredibly high rates and intensity. More than ever they need adults to remain reflective and attend to what is underneath challenging behavior. This presentation is aimed at increasing helping professionals’, teachers’, caregivers’ and parents’ ability to recognize how and where a child is struggling, name it and use concise language to join the child in distress.  

Grounded in a racialized trauma lens, attachment theory and stress biology, we will discuss how to join children in distress, become hired as helpers and co-create goals. Using our own reflective capacity as adults and language as a tool, educators and caregivers can create helpful spaces for problem solving rather than power struggles. 

Lauren W. Nietz, MSW, LICSW

Level: Basic | For: Professionals & Parents | Ages Addressed: Early Childhood – School Age

Monday, February 22
9 a.m. –  12 p.m. CST

Live Webinar | 3 CEHs | $89 $46 (special winter rate)

Workshop information for registered webinar participants.

About the Presenter

Lauren W. Nietz, MSW, LICSW, is the Training Institute Director at Washburn Center for Children. She has served children and families in the Twin Cities as an in-home family therapist, outpatient clinician, and Day Treatment Program supervisor. Lauren utilizes and trains in Developmental Repair, a treatment model created at Washburn Center. Lauren has a certificate in Infant and Early Childhood Mental Health from the Institute of Child Development and is a Community Faculty member in the School of Social Work at the University of Minnesota.


Convening Tough Conversations Between Adolescent Adoptees and Parents

Working effectively with teens and parents joined through adoption, who have lived through attachment disruptions and relational trauma, requires a specific set of perspectives not often taught in clinical training. It requires knowledge of challenges adopted teens face in claiming identity and independence, especially if one is from another race and culture than adoptive parents. It also draws from an ability to see teen’s behavior as cues to survival needs. To work with adoptive teens struggling with their parents means to be active in facilitating parent-teen dialogue; to tolerate, at times, explosive expressions of fear and loss; and maintain the ability to draw out humor, play and delight. Integrative therapy interventions will be demonstrated to increase participants’ confidence in facilitating conversations of belonging, independence and identity between adopted youth and their parents.    

Learning Objectives:

+ Appreciate the specific context adopted teens face in discovering identity and independence, especially when of different race and culture than adoptive parents. 
+ Conceptualize anxious or disruptive teens as enacting attachment patterns to get survival needs met within their family systems.
+ Practice specific family therapy skills of engagement, enactment and choreographing steps of relational repair when attachment security has been disrupted between an adoptive parent and adopted teen.

Krista Nelson, LICSW, LMFT, Psychotherapist and Trauma Consultant – Family Circle Counseling PLLC

Level: Advanced  | For: Therapists, Social Workers, Children’s Mental Health Case Managers | Ages Addressed: 13 – 18 | Includes Clinical Content

Wednesday, March 3
9 a.m. – 12 p.m. CST

Live Webinar | 3 CEHs | $89 $45 (special winter rate)

Workshop information for registered webinar participants.

About the Presenter

Krista Nelson, LICSW, LMFT, has thirty years of post-masters experience working with children and parents who are coping with attachment loss, trauma and family changes, especially with youth who entered a family through adoption.  She is co-founder of Family Circle Counseling in St. Paul, MN and led the Wilder Foundation’s Attachment and Trauma Training program from 2001 to 2017.  Krista is a frequent speaker at statewide mental health conferences on issues of attachment and trauma. She continues to co-facilitate the popular MN ADOPT parent workshop Surviving and Thriving Beyond the RAD Diagnosis.  Krista is an attachment focused family therapist with advanced training in EMDR, Theraplay and Emotion Focused Couples Counseling who loves the balance of doing therapy with playful children, teens, adult adoptees, parents and couples in their quest for healing.


Infant & Early Childhood Focus

Developmental Consequences of Parental Incarceration for Infants and Young Children

This workshop will explore the developmental consequences of parental incarceration for infants and young children. We’ll consider how the incarceration of a parent –– and co-occurring Adverse Childhood Experiences –– can compromise healthy social, emotional, physical and cognitive development. The workshop will also address ways to support relationships between incarcerated parents and their infants and young children.

Presented by Rebecca J. Shlafer, PhD, MPH, Assistant Professor – Division of General Pediatrics and Adolescent Health, University of Minnesota

Level: Intermediate | For: Professionals and Parents | Ages Addressed: Prenatal – Age 6

Monday, March 8
9 a.m. – 12 p.m. CST

Live Webinar | 3 CEHs | $89 $45 (special winter rate)

Workshop information for registered webinar participants.

About the Presenter

Rebecca Shlafer, PhD, MPH, is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Minnesota. Dr. Shlafer is a developmental child psychologist with additional training in maternal and child public health. Dr. Shlafer’s research focuses on the health and development of children and families affected by incarceration.


Infant & Early Childhood Focus

Helping Families Guide Their Young Children in Growing and Learning in Spite of COVID

Families are marking this seemingly impossible anniversary—a year since the effects of COVID started. How have we survived? Will this ever end? And what is happening to our young children, when their lives have been so altered? COVID occurred without warning, so we were all caught off guard. Professionals who support families must recognize how untoward events like the COVID pandemic trigger changes and cause a myriad of effects. Making sense of these family and community changes, and supporting families to adapt and anticipate what’s ahead, will be the focus of this training. We will use developmental foundations to consider how COVID experiences may influence what today’s young children and their parents need now.

Anne Gearity, PhD

Level: Basic | For: Professionals & Parents| Ages Addressed: Prenatal – Age 6

Thursday, March 25
9 a.m. – 12 p.m. CST

Live Webinar | 3 CEHs | $89 $45 (special winter rate)

Workshop information for registered webinar participants.

About the Presenter

Anne R. Gearity, PhD, LICSW, has a mental health practice in Minneapolis, and provides consultation to agencies and schools.  She authored Developmental Repair, in collaboration with staff at Washburn Center for Children. DR is a treatment approach for aggressive and disruptive young children that proposes to fix deficits and disruptions of self-regulation, recognizing (through infant research) how these deficits and disruptions put children at risk.  She taught in the UMN infant and early childhood mental health certificate program, and is now faculty in the department of child psychiatry.  Recently she has been privileged to consult with the HCMC Mother/Baby program as they expand their model.

CEHs

Our Training Series is designed to meet continuing education requirements for many disciplines. The following boards have provided CEH approval:
+ MN Board of Behavioral Health & Therapy (LPC, LPCC, LADC)
+ MN Board of Marriage & Family Therapy (Ethics hours approved are as follows: September 29 – 1 hour; October 8 – 3 hours; October 13 – 1 hour; October 20 – 1 hour)
+ MN Board of Social Work
+ MN Board of Psychology 

The following boards do not require pre-approved CEHs. CEHs should be approved upon independent submission to your board:
+ MN Board of Education
+ MN Nursing Board
+ ND Board of Social Work

Professionals in other related disciplines, as well as those working outside of Minnesota, can submit CEH certificates to their corresponding boards for independent approval.

A certificate of attendance will be provided to all registered training attendees. Boards may request attendance records at any time. We will track who watched the recording as a live webinar and also for those who watch the recording within 30 days of the live webinar event.