Events | Trainings

Join us for our Children’s Mental Health Training Series – designed for those who work with or care for infants, children and youth. Upcoming workshop topics include ADHD, self-care, trauma, video gaming disorder, moving beyond behaviorism and more. New webinars are added regularly.

Not able to join us live? No problem. Each webinar will be recorded and available for registered attendees to watch for 45 days following the live session.

To make our trainings more accessible during the COVID-19 pandemic, our webinars are being offered at half their normal rate: $15 per CEH.

Explore continuing education (CEH) details for our Training Series.

Read our Community Chat Guidelines for all webinar participants.


Breathe Well, Stress Less

Webinar  | 3 CEHs

In this workshop, participants will discover the power of the breath and why breathing is the cornerstone of stress management and self-regulation. We will explore breathing mechanics (the how), psychology of breathing (the why) and its impact on wellbeing.

Learn More | Register


Healing for the Helpers

Webinar  | 2 CEHs

In this workshop participants will get an opportunity to process the impact of toxic stress (work related, professional, personal) and learn strategies for processing their own responses to stress.

Learn More  | Register


The Ethics of Self Care: Becoming a Resilient Therapist

Webinar | 3 CEHs

This interactive workshop will help participants understand how connected self-care is to resilience, and therefore how important self-care is to best practice. Relevant ethical codes (NASW, APA, ACA and AAMFT) will be discussed,

Learn More | Register


Video Gaming Disorder: Signs, Symptoms and Help

Webinar | 2 CEHs

For many, playing video games is an enjoyable and harmless pastime. For others, gaming can become a problematic preoccupation. In this webinar, participants will explore discuss video gaming trends, technology advances that increase addictive potential and treatment approaches for problem gaming

Learn More | Register


Techniques for Connecting with Teens with Challenging Behaviors

Webinar | 2 CEHs

Connecting with the youth we serve is an important part of being effective in our work – however some youth with trauma or trust challenges can be harder to connect with. This presentation will explore 3 specific strategies for building connections with youth.

Learn More | Register


Strategies for Effective Reflective Supervision

Webinar  | 3 CEHs | Infant & Early Childhood Focus

Participants will learn how to keep the three levels of attunement present as they engage in reflective supervision. Time will also be spent practicing specific supervision tools.

Learn More | Register


Demystifying the Connection Between ADHD & Emotional Dysregulation/ Rejection Sensitivity

Webinar  | 3 CEHs

This presentation will review emerging trends from cognitive neuroscience research on the leading causes of emotional dysregulation and rejection sensitivity in the ADHD brain, as well as strategies for managing emotional dysregulation and rejection-sensitivity.

Learn More  | Register


Ethical Awareness in Reflective Consultation

Webinar  | 2 CEHs | Infant & Early Childhood Focus

In order to serve our consultees well, we must have awareness on multiple levels, including content, meaning, cultural factors and ethics. This presentation will focus on issues related to ethics and ethical awareness in reflective consultation.

Learn More | Register


Trauma and Sensory Processing: Definitions, Examples and Strategies

Webinar  | 2 CEHs | Infant & Early Childhood Focus

This presentation will cover pertinent definitions and evidence-based connections to the outward responses (i.e. behaviors, emotional challenges, etc) that are often seen in children that are having difficulty with sensory processing. 

Learn More | Register


Understanding Social Emotional Development and a Way to Healing

Webinar  | 2 CEHs | Infant & Early Childhood Focus

During this webinar, participants will explore ways to foster healing by focusing on each child’s individual needs and examining how to help families support children at home.

Learn More  | Register


Beyond Behaviorism: Shifting the Lens When Assessing and Supporting Behaviors

Webinar  | 4 CEHs

When we know better, we do better! Let’s take current relational and neuroscience research and use it to redesign tools we use frequently in schools and community settings – functional behavioral assessments and positive behavioral intervention plans.

Learn More  | Register


Supporting Indigenous Children and Families: Understanding Risk and Resilience in Cultural, Community and Historical Context and Implications for Practice

Recording Available through December 10

This workshop will provide a broad overview of the Indigenous population in the U.S. with a focus on the historical, cultural and community factors that shape young children’s development. The workshop will help participants develop a deeper understanding of the risks to development that derive from historical and structural inequalities prevalent in many tribal communities as well as the sources of resilience that derive from the rich cultural beliefs, practices and extended family relationships that are also prevalent. This workshop is intended for participants with a range of experience working with Indigenous children and families, including participants who may have had little experience to date. Suggestions for practices that support Indigenous children and families will be shared, along with opportunities for discussion.

Susan Beaulieu, Independent Consultant – NDN Collective

Level: Basic | For: Participants with a range of experience working with Indigenous children and families, including participants who may have had little experience to date | Ages Addressed: Birth to Adulthood | Cultural Competency Included

Thursday, November 10
12:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m. CST

2 CEHs | $30 (special fall rate)

Workshop information for registered webinar participants.

About the Presenter

Susan is an Anishinaabe citizen of the Red Lake Nation and has been working with tribal communities over 14 years in a variety of capacities including project development, training, and facilitation. She previously served as the Director of Tribal Projects at Minnesota Communities Caring for Children (MCCC) where she developed and implemented the Tribal N.E.A.R. Sciences and Community Wisdom Project, and most recently worked for the University of Minnesota Extension as an Extension Educator, providing resources and support to tribal nations and communities around the state on topics including trauma and toxic stress, ACEs, epigenetics neuroscience, resilience and healing. She is currently an independent consultant working with Indigenous communities and organizations to support healing and wellbeing. Susan is pursuing her PhD in Social and Administrative Pharmacy at the University of Minnesota-College of Pharmacy and received her Master’s in Public Policy degree from the University of Minnesota’s Hubert H. Humphrey Institute. Susan was a 2016 Bush Leadership Fellow focused on understanding and generating healing and wellbeing at the individual and collective levels. She is a mother of 4 and resides with her family in central Minnesota.


Breathe Well, Stress Less

Tuesday, December 6 • 9:00 a.m. to 12 p.m.

The breath. It is the first and last thing we use in this world, and it never leaves our side. 

It’s also either hurting or helping us at all times. In our fast-paced world, many people are over-breathing, mouth breathing, breathing too fast and sometimes flat out just breathing wrong. Research is evident on the importance of breath and its impact on physiology and biochemistry. Yet the breath is so often overlooked when it comes to our health.  

We breathe over 20,000 times a day, but most of us breathe in a way that increases stress and anxiety. Our nervous system hasn’t caught up to the modern world and is working overtime to protect us. The ability to influence your nervous system response is the root of breathwork. This presentation will first show you how to use the breath to modulate the nervous system, boost self-regulation and resilience, and then teach it to children. 

Breathing is an evidence-based, natural, cost-effective and drug-free alternative to modifying mood and emotional state — the only proven real-time tool to shift from stress to calm in minutes. The breathing and stress connection is why we need to start paying attention to HOW we breathe. We breathe automatically, but we also can breathe on purpose to reduce stress and anxiety, improve focus, enhance sleep quality and boost immunity.

In this workshop, participants will discover the power of the breath and why breathing is the cornerstone of stress management and self-regulation. We will explore breathing mechanics (the how) and psychology of breathing (the why) and its impact on wellbeing.

Don’t just breathe to survive; learn how to breathe to thrive!

Stephanie Esser, MAEd, RYT200, Level 2 BREATHE™ Coach, Founder/Owner & Breathing Coach – Balancing Elephants, Inc.

Level: Basic | For: Parents, teachers, therapists, and caregivers | Ages Addressed: 5+

Tuesday, December 6
9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. CST

3 CEHs | $45 (special fall rate)

Workshop information for registered webinar participants.

About the Presenter

Stephanie Esser, MA.Ed., owner at Balancing Elephants, breathing coach, and creator of the BE Buddy®, a mindful tool to help kids breathe well to BE well.  

She is a certified functional breathing coach, providing evidence-based tools and methodologies to support students’ social and emotional learning and to enhance physical, mental, and emotional wellbeing through breathwork and relaxation techniques. 

Breathwork is a proactive approach to mental health; with practice, kids will have this resource wherever they go. This lifelong modern-day skill will help kids manage stress, improve focus, boost performance and feel connected to themselves and others. 

If you want to change your thoughts, learn how to regulate your nervous system through breathwork. This is the lowest hanging fruit for self-regulation and is a skill that can be taught and practiced.

Stephanie follows a trauma-informed approach to teaching breathwork to parents, teachers, therapists, and children, both in-person & remotely (individual or group). Her approach is casual and fun and focuses on functional breathing biomechanics, biochemistry, and the psychological influences of breathing habits. 

 The breath is your superpower. Learn how to use it!


Healing for the Helpers

Tuesday, December 13 • 12:30 to 2:30 p.m.

In this workshop participants will get an opportunity to process the impact of toxic stress (work related, professional, personal) and learn strategies for processing their own responses to stress.

Session participants will gain a better understanding of:

+ The types of stress
+ Learn strategies for managing stress in self and others
+ Recognize signs and symptoms of stress
+ Create a compassion care/self-care plan
+ Opportunity to assess their level of stress and potential burnout

Kamyala Howard, MSW, LCSW, President and Lead Consultant – WE’RE DIVINE LLC

Level: Basic | For: Professional and or caregivers working with: communities impacted by adversity, youth, parents and other caregivers. Mental health professionals, child development professionals, teachers/educators, any individual working within or exposed to a potentially stressful environmentals working directly with children and youth | Ages Addressed: Everyone

Tuesday, December 13
12:30 – 2:30 p.m. CST

2 CEHs | $30 (special fall rate)

Workshop information for registered webinar participants.

About the Presenter

Kamyala Howard (she, her, hers), MSW, LCSW, is the founder of WE’RE DIVINE professional development and consulting.

Ms. Howard is a licensed mental health practitioner certified in a range of evidence-based practices and training methodologies. She received her graduate degree from the University of Minnesota with special emphasis on cultural studies, community relations, leadership development and direct clinical behavioral health.

 Ms. Howard has over 15+ years of leadership experience developing innovative strategies that challenge individuals to lean into the unknown areas of discussion and content that are often avoided, to cultivate transformation and growth.


The Ethics of Self Care: Becoming a Resilient Therapist

Monday, January 30 • 9:00 a.m. to 12 p.m.

How can we support resilience in our clients if we cannot or do not feel it within ourselves? Dr. Kirsten Lind Seal proposes thinking of self care as an ethical obligation; if we do not care for ourselves properly and regularly then we will not have the resilience (mental, physical, emotional and spiritual) to do our best work with our clients. This interactive workshop will help participants understand how connected self-care is to resilience, and therefore how important self-care is to best practice. Emphasis will be placed on our own ideas of ways to live in hope, sustain and support connection with loved ones and community, and create meaning, both in our lives and in our work. Relevant ethical codes (NASW, APA, ACA and AAMFT) will also be discussed and applied to this concept.

Three Learning Objectives:

+ Participants will learn how lack of/poor self-care leads to anxiety, burn-out and exhaustion, and thus away from best practice.
+Participants will review recent literature on resilience and its implications for best practice.
+ Participants will have a plan to integrate more regular self-care into their practice in a way that will lead to their own resilience, thus supporting best ethical practice.

Dr. Kirsten Lind Seal, PhD, LMFT, Adjunct Associate Professor of MFT Ethics – Saint Mary’s University of Minnesota & Ethics Doctoral Faculty – Chaminade University of Honolulu

Level: Intermediate | For: Practitioners & Educators

Monday, January 30
9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. CST

3 CEHs | $45 (special winter rate)

About the Presenter

Kirsten Lind Seal (MA Counseling Psychology/PhD Couple and Family Therapy) is Adjunct Associate Professor of Ethics where she teaches MFT graduate students at Saint Mary’s University of Minnesota. She will also be teaching Ethics to the inaugural doctoral MFT cohort this Fall at Chaminade University of Honolulu. Her research has been published in the Journal of Marriage and Family Therapy, the Journal of Couple and Family Relationships, and Psychology Today. She has published multiple case studies in the Psychotherapy Networker.  She presents locally, nationally and internationally on ethics and cross-cultural issues, and has done multiple webinars during the pandemic. She maintains a completely virtual private practice and appears regularly on WCCO (CBS) TV’s Midmorning show in Relationship Reboot, a segment dealing with relationships.


Video Gaming Disorder: Signs, Symptoms & Help

Monday, February 6 • 12:30 to 2:30 p.m.

For many, playing video games is an enjoyable and harmless pastime. For others, gaming can become a problematic preoccupation. Increasing numbers of adolescents and adults are experiencing significant negative consequences as a result of excessive video gaming.

In this webinar, educator and clinician Zachary Hansen will discuss video gaming trends, technology advances that increase addictive potential, criteria for internet gaming disorder, and treatment approaches for problem gaming. Dr. Hansen will also discuss the potential co-occurrence of problematic gaming with other behavioral health issues.

Three Learning Objectives:

+ Understand the criteria for internet gaming disorder.
+ Identify trends in video gaming culture and technology that contribute to addictive behaviors.
+ Learn strategies for conceptualizing and treating video game addiction.

Dr. Zach Hansen, Assistant Professor – Hazelden Betty Ford Graduation School

Level: Intermediate | For: Everyone | Ages Addressed: All Ages

Monday, February 6
12:30 to 2:30 p.m. CST

2 CEHs | $30 (special winter rate)

About the Presenter

Dr. Hansen is a counselor educator specializing in addiction counseling and treatment of co-occurring disorders. His academic and research interests include: process addictions, group counseling, clinical intuition, adolescent counseling, clinical supervision, and existential psychotherapy. Dr. Hansen currently serves as an Assistant Professor for the Hazelden Betty Ford Graduate School of Addiction Studies. Previously, he served as an Assistant Professor and Program Coordinator for the Alcohol and Drug Studies Program at Minnesota State University, Mankato. His clinical experience includes adult and adolescent addiction counseling in inpatient and outpatient settings, and outpatient adult mental health counseling. Dr. Hansen is a Licensed Alcohol and Drug Counselor and National Certified Counselor, and enjoys presenting on a variety of topics at regional and national conferences.


Techniques for Connecting with Teens with the Most Challenging Behaviors

Thursday, February 9 • 12:30 to 2:30 p.m.

Connecting with the youth we serve is an important part of being effective in our work. Youth who have adults they connect with and trust are more likely to work toward positive change and growth for themselves – however, some teens struggle to make connections with adults. There are plenty of strategies for support, but some kids can feel much harder to connect with – whether the reason be trauma, trust issues or a combination of factors. Over her 12 years working with juveniles in the correctional system, Maya J. Mason has met youth with some of the most challenging, distrusting behaviors. Over time, she has developed 3 great strategies to support adults in connecting with youth.

Three Learning Objectives:

+ Gain understanding of importance of connecting with you for success in the work that we do.
+ Learn tips for effectiveness with youth with histories of trauma
+ Learn 3 strategies for connecting with youth.

Maya J. Mason, Supervisor of the Anoka County Non-Secure Correctional Facility – Anoka County Community Corrections

Level: Basic | For: Everyone | Ages Addressed: 10 – 19 years old

Thursday, February 9
12:30 to 2:30 p.m. CST

2 CEHs | $30 (special winter rate)

About the Presenter

Maya J. Mason graduated from the University of Wisconsin at Madison in 2009 with a BA in Legal Studies and a certificate in Criminal Justice. Maya worked in Corrections in both Hennepin and Ramsey County before finding a professional home at Anoka County’s Juvenile Center (ACJC) in 2015. Since starting in Anoka, Maya has worked her way up the ranks to a supervisor of the Non-Secure Program. Maya is trained in many group facilitation curriculums. Her specialty areas are working with girls and youth with significant trauma. Maya is also passionate about staff wellness and founded the ACJC’s Peer Support Team. Maya is a trainer on a number of topics under the subjects of diversity, body image, youth engagement and staff wellness. She is also a writer and you can find her professional writings on Corrections1.com.


Strategies for Effective Reflective Supervision

Monday, February 13 • 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.

In this interactive presentation, participants will explore reflection and why it matters in the work we do on behalf of families and children. Participants will have the opportunity to share, learn and practice core reflective supervision skills including curiosity, using a reflective framework, and using breath and body-based practices. Concepts will be explored within the context of three levels of attunement: to self, to other, and to self and other within systems (organizational and experiences of systemic oppression).

Three Learning Objectives:

+ Participants will be able to define reflective supervision and give at least two reasons why it is important in the work we do with families and children.
+ Participants will gain practical knowledge about how to keep the three levels of attunement present as they engage in reflective supervision – attunement to self, other, and self and other within systems.
+ Participants will understand and practice tools for reflective supervision, including building and maintaining curiosity, using a reflective framework and grounding in body- and breath-based practices.

Tekla Johnson, LCSW, IMH-E, Professional Coach, Director – First Born® Model Office and Institute for Innovative Family Programs, Santa Fe, NM

Level: Basic | For: Everyone

Monday, February 23
9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. CST

3 CEHs | $45 (special winter rate)

About the Presenter

Tekla Johnson, First Born® Model Office Director, is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker, Certified Doula, Certified Professional Coach and has received Infant Mental Health Endorsement. Tekla has worked in home visiting and early intervention for 23 years. She was a home visitor for 9 years and has worked in leadership roles for early childhood and home visiting programs since 2009. Tekla is passionate about life-long learning, connection, and equity. Outside of work, Tekla loves spending time with her family, meditating, gardening and running.


Demystifying the Connection Between ADHD and Emotional Dysregulation/Rejection Sensitivity

Tuesday, February 28 • 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.

It has long been recognized that many individuals with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) also have difficulties with emotion regulation. But a lack of consensus on conceptualizing this clinically challenging domain has resulted in a lack of understanding. This has resulted partly due to researchers ignoring the emotional component of ADHD because it cannot be easily measured. Yet emotional disruptions are the most impairing aspects of the condition at any age. ADHD-related symptoms cannot be managed without fully understanding and managing the emotional components of the disorder. This presentation explores the major components of emotional dysregulation and rejection-sensitivity dysphoria. In addition, this presentation will review the emerging trends from cognitive neuroscience research on the leading causes of emotional dysregulation and rejection sensitivity in the ADHD brain. This presentation will also review strategies for managing emotional dysregulation and rejection-sensitivity dysphoria.

Three Learning Objectives:

+ Gain an understanding of neuroscience research on emotional dysregulation and rejection-sensitivity dysphoria.
+ Review how emotional dysregulation and rejection-sensitivity dysphoria as it pertains to ADHD differs from regular emotion sensitivity.
+ Learn about techniques and strategies to manage emotional dysregulation and rejection-sensitivity dysphoria.

Gary Johnson, PhD, Clinic Director & Kotatee Tamba, PsyD, Postdoctoral Neurocognitive Clinician – Clinic for Attention, Learning and Memory (CALM)

Level: Basic | For: Everyone | Ages Addressed: All Ages

Tuesday, February 28
9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. CST

3 CEHs | $45 (special winter rate)

About the Presenters

Gary Johnson founded and is the director of the Clinic for Attention, Learning, and Memory (CALM) supporting complex attention and learning issues. He is a relentless advocate for careful, comprehensive and strength-based assessment. Clinic director for 31 years, performing more than 4,500 evaluations, Dr. Johnson also provides supervision and training to doctoral students. He partnered with Native American communities to help families improve understanding of cognition to advocate within both clinical and academic settings. He has been an enthusiastic presenter at MACMH conferences for 20 years.

Kotatee Tamba is a post-doctoral clinician at CALM where he administers and interprets neurocognitive tests and provides coaching to clients. He is an approved supervisor through the Minnesota Board of Social Work and Minnesota Board of Behavioral Health & Therapy. Kotatee has worked as a therapist for the past eight years. He is dedicated to helping individuals and families attain baseline functioning by supporting emotional, relational and developmental growth.


Ethical Awareness in Reflective Consultation

Monday, March 6 • 12:30 to 2:30 p.m.

Reflective consultation is an enormous responsibility. In order to serve our consultees well, it requires awareness on multiple levels, including content, meaning, cultural factors and ethics.  This presentation will focus on issues related to ethics and ethical awareness in reflective consultation. It will include an opportunity to use a format by which to process ethical issues.

Three Learning Objectives:

+ Participants will understand the significance of the role of ethics in culturally-informed reflective consultation.
+ Participants will identify three areas of concern regarding ethics in reflective consultation.
+ Participants will become familiar with a process to address ethical concerns.

Carol F. Siegel, PhD, LP, Clinical Psychologist, Instructor – University of Minnesota

Level: Intermediate | For: Anyone Doing Reflective Consultation

Monday, March 6
12:30 to 2:30 p.m. CST

2 CEHs | $30 (special winter rate)

About the Presenter

Carol F. Siegel, PhD, LP is a licensed clinical psychologist in Minneapolis who sees parents and children in her private practice. Her primary clinical focus is parenting and issues encountered by parents with complex histories. This may include depression, stress, adoption, foster care, trauma, abuse or neglect. Dr. Siegel is a consultant to clinical and home-visiting programs around Minnesota and has been teaching in the Infant and Early Childhood Mental Health Master’s and Certificate Program at the University of Minnesota since 2007. She is endorsed by the Minnesota Infant and Early Childhood Mental Health Association as an Infant Mental Health Clinical Mentor (Level IV).


Trauma and Sensory Processing: Definitions, Examples & Strategies

Monday, March 13 • 12:30 to 2:30 p.m.

This presentation is an introduction to sensory processing and its relationship with children that have experienced trauma. It will cover pertinent definitions and evidence-based connections to the outward responses (i.e. behaviors, emotional difficulties, etc) that are often seen in children that are having difficulty with sensory processing. The training will provide examples to increase comprehension and demonstrations of strategies that are appropriate for immediate use in work with children.

Four Learning Objectives:

+ Attendees will be able to define basic sensory processing related terminology.
+ Attendees will be able to identify the relationship between sensory processing and children who have experienced trauma.
+ Attendees will be able to recognize the signs of sensory dysregulation in children who have experienced trauma.
+ Attendees will be able to implement at least 5 sensory based strategies to increase sensory regulation.

Alyssa Mason, Occupational Therapist – M Health Fairview 

Level: Basic | For: Everyone | For: Birth to Young Adolescence

Monday, March 13
12:30 to 2:30 p.m. CST

2 CEHs | $30 (special winter rate)

About the Presenter

Alyssa Mason is a pediatric occupational therapist. She received her undergraduate degree in Human Development and Family Studies with a focus on child development and a master’s degree in occupational therapy with certificates in equity and diversity, and disability and policy. Alyssa has experience working as an early childhood educator, and a Children’s Mental Health Targeted Case Manager before starting work as a pediatric occupational therapist across multiple settings including schools, inpatient hospitals and outpatient clinics. She completed 2 years as a fellow with MNLEND (Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental and related Disabilities) which consisted of interdisciplinary leadership, policy and advocacy training.


Understanding Social Emotional Development and a Way to Healing

Monday, March 27 • 12:30 to 2:30 p.m.

During this presentation, participants will learn to define stages of social emotional development and how to support children through each stage. The presenter will explore ways to foster healing by focusing on each child’s individual needs and examine how to support families by exploring resources that help families support children at home.

Three Learning Objectives:

+ Participants will be able to recognize and identify Social Emotional Development and how to foster healing.
+ Participants will learn Social Emotional Strategies that help children with self-regulation.
+ Participants will gain access to a field of resources on fostering healing with children and families.

Tiffany Grant, Business Development Manager/Trainer/Coach – First Children’s Finance 

Level: Basic | For: Early childhood professionals, family members, social services professionals | For: Preschool Age (3-5 years old)

Monday, March 27
12:30 to 2:30 p.m. CST

2 CEHs | $30 (special winter rate)

About the Presenter

Tiffany Grant is currently working to fortify the ECE business model as a Business Development Manager at First Children’s Finance. As a continuing advocate for equity and inclusion, she helped establish a peer networking resource group for entrepreneurs of color called Community Conversations for Early Childhood Entrepreneurs. Tiffany’s expertise lies in bridging the gaps between childcare business, advocacy, and equity where she has sought to help BOPIC business owners navigate the structural and systemic barriers they encounter every day. Tiffany has a talent for identifying areas of the Early Childhood Field where discrepancies exist and has worked to specifically target those areas of need. Her work in coaching and training, as well as in compliance and curriculum development has helped to highlight these needs. Knowing the importance of continuing education, Tiffany also works as a trainer in the subjects of early childhood trauma, African American Language. Additional examples of meaningful contributions to the field include co-founding an ECE branch within the Excell Academy for Higher Learning charter school. Tiffany attended Metropolitan State University where she received her bachelor’s degree in Early Childhood Studies with a focus on psychology and leadership.


Beyond Behaviorism: Shifting the Lens When Assessing and Supporting Behaviors

Thursday, April 13 • 12:30 to 4:30 p.m.

Many professionals are working tirelessly to shift the behavioral paradigm away from the traditional behavioral approach and toward what current relational and neuroscience research has taught us. When we know better, we do better! Let’s take that information and use it to redesign tools we use frequently in schools and community settings today – functional behavioral assessments and positive behavioral intervention plans. If you are struggling with these processes and if they do not align with your current philosophy and belief system, then this workshop is for you! Participants will get a deep dive into how to make these common processes more trauma sensitive, neurodiversity-affirming and aligned with current research.

Three Learning Objectives:

+ Participants will describe what a functional behavioral assessment is and when it is needed.
+ Participants will describe the brief history of the functional behavioral assessment and positive behavioral intervention plan.
+ Participants will describe at least 5 shifts to align functional behavioral assessments and behavior support plans with current knowledge and research.

Connie Persike, MS, CCC/SLP, Speech Pathologist and Educational Consultant – Supportable Solutions

Level: Basic | For: Administrators, Occupational Therapists, Speech Pathologists, Educators, Clinicians, Community Support Members, Parents, School Psychologists, Social Workers | For: All Ages

Thursday, April 13
12:30 to 4:30 p.m. CST

4 CEHs | $60 (special winter rate)

About the Presenter

Connie Persike is a highly experienced Speech Language Pathologist and Educational Consultant. As founder of Supportable Solutions, she brings 20+ years of experience in educational settings to provide insight, guidance, coaching, and support to school districts, agencies, and families across Wisconsin — and throughout the country. Connie holds a certificate in instructional coaching, positive education, and applied educational neuroscience. She created an innovative process to assess behavior, which deviates from the traditional behaviorism approach and aligns with neuroscience while maintaining a trauma-sensitive and neurodiversity-affirming approach. Connie works from the guiding mission that Connection + Collaboration = Endless Possibilities.


CEHs

Our Training Series is designed to meet continuing education requirements for many disciplines. The following boards have provided CEH approval:

  • MN Board of Behavioral Health & Therapy – LPC, LPCC
  • MN Board of Behavioral Health & Therapy – LADC
  • MN Board of Marriage & Family Therapy
  • MN Board of Social Work
  • MN Board of Psychology

The following boards do not require pre-approved CEHs. CEHs should be approved upon independent submission to your board:

  • MN Board of Education
  • MN Nursing Board
  • ND Board of Social Work

Professionals in other related disciplines, as well as those working outside of Minnesota, can submit CEH certificates to their corresponding boards for independent approval.

A certificate of attendance will be provided to all registered training attendees. Boards may request attendance records at any time. We will track who watched the recording as a live webinar and also for those who watch the recording within 30 days of the live webinar event.


Online Community Chat Guidelines

We care about your mental health, and it’s important that our trainings provide a safe, respectful space for our participants and presenters to learn and engage with one another.

Thank you for following our online community chat guidelines and noting our process for addressing harmful comments.

Chat Guidelines

+ Be respectful: Use language that respects people of every culture, race, ethnicity, gender identity, sexual orientation, religion, class, ability and background; avoid profanity and other language that could be offensive

+ Speak from your own experience: Use “I” statements as in “I feel,” “I think” and “I want”

+ Honor privacy: Do not share anyone else’s personal information and keep client information confidential

+ Think before you type: Remember that this webinar and chat thread are being recorded and will be posted online

Addressing Harmful Comments

If a webinar host deems a comment to be inappropriate, harmful or derogatory, the host will send a private message to the attendee. If the harmful comments continue, the attendee may be removed from the Chat function and possibly the webinar.